MIXED USE

Integration of functions and facilities in urban space provides conditions for the overlap of various activities, dynamic atmosphere and suitability to different user groups throughout the year.

Luka Beograd

CITY ON WATER

MIXED USE 

Mixed use principle is the imperative in contemporary urban planning. Is is applied to public spaces, towns, business and commercial centres, sport complexes, parks, streets and individual buildings. It represents a mix of functions and purposes in order to create spaces which are vibrant and dynamic during the entire day.

It came as a response to the consequences of a mono-functional approach which has dominated space planning in most world cities. Common expression "dormitory" which has often been applied to residential areas or parts of the city clearly illustrates consequences of this approach which, with its clear-cut distribution of functions to residential space, work, traffic and entertainment, produced places that are typicly passive, bland and isolated.

By integrating functions and facilities in an urban space, mixed use principle provided the conditions for the overlap of various activities, dynamic atmosphere and convenience for different user groups throughout the year.

Mixed use principle has been applied in the entire Master Plan, to all neighbourhoods, new promenade on the Danube riverbank, major park, public spaces but also to each lot and individual building so that all functions are always integrated in a different ratio: residential space, commercial activities, culture, sport, public services, recreation etc.

Each neigbourhood is specially designed according to the mixed use principle depending on its purpose, character and specific identity.

Combination of purposes is adjusted to the special position of each neighbourhood. Depending on its location, some will resemble city centre, while the others will have residential appearance with local shops, salons, kindergartens and schools.

Neighbourhoods are also distinct in their street scheme, the ratio between buildings and open spaces, the relation among different heights of the buildings and the character of public areas. Each neighbourhood has its own programme which includes meeting places, sites and unique characteristics which create its own identity. A promenade and a linear park connect neighbourhoods in a coherent unit providing each of them access to the river, gorgeous green belt and to the city itself.

Mixed use principle is the imperative in contemporary urban planning. Is is applied to public spaces, towns, business and commercial centres, sport complexes, parks, streets and individual buildings. It represents a mix of functions and purposes in order to create spaces which are vibrant and dynamic during the entire day.

It came as a response to the consequences of a mono-functional approach which has dominated space planning in most world cities. Common expression "dormitory" which has often been applied to residential areas or parts of the city clearly illustrates consequences of this approach which, with its clear-cut distribution of functions to residential space, work, traffic and entertainment, produced places that are typicly passive, bland and isolated.

By integrating functions and facilities in an urban space, mixed use principle provided the conditions for the overlap of various activities, dynamic atmosphere and convenience for different user groups throughout the year.

Mixed use principle has been applied in the entire Master Plan, to all neighbourhoods, new promenade on the Danube riverbank, major park, public spaces but also to each lot and individual building so that all functions are always integrated in a different ratio: residential space, commercial activities, culture, sport, public services, recreation etc.

Each neigbourhood is specially designed according to the mixed use principle depending on its purpose, character and specific identity.

Combination of purposes is adjusted to the special position of each neighbourhood. Depending on its location, some will resemble city centre, while the others will have residential appearance with local shops, salons, kindergartens and schools.

Neighbourhoods are also distinct in their street scheme, the ratio between buildings and open spaces, the relation among different heights of the buildings and the character of public areas. Each neighbourhood has its own programme which includes meeting places, sites and unique characteristics which create its own identity. A promenade and a linear park connect neighbourhoods in a coherent unit providing each of them access to the river, gorgeous green belt and to the city itself.